CALIFORNIA FARMING and WATER

NO WATER = NO JOBS

IS GROWING FOOD A WASTE OF WATER?

DAMS NOT TRAINS

FOOD GROWS WHERE WATER FLOWS

SAVE CALIFORNIA WATER

CONGRESS-CREATED DUST BOWL

Those are some of the signs one sees on Highway 5, on which I traveled last week, between Los Angeles and San Francisco.

For some reason, this big city girl loves farming….I am utterly fascinated by the rows of trees planted along the highway and utterly devastated at the dry land between those green and fertile areas.   But, this big city girl also loves a lot of country music, so …!! But I digress.

The signs are true, in my opinion…valid, in my opinion;  we need FOOD, the land will not suffer for having more water and producing beautiful food for all of America.  The little fish that blocks much of the water coming into California isn’t the least bit important, but it’s won.

We drove by fields of dryness I hoped against hope were fields of hay already cut down, and I did see some bundled hay, but I fear most of that land is dry nothingness where trees should be growing.  Also, there are acres and acres of gorgeous trees in various heights of their lives, sapling, mature trees, and they get water.  HOW?   I suppose it’s meted out somehow.

HERE is a good piece on this problem. HERE is the definitive story on the smelt and how that threatens our water.  People don’t eat smelt, but it’s endangered.  I don’t care, frankly.  And I’m a bit of environmentalist myself.  Also, articles from the left on this issue add Chinook Salmon to the list of fish keeping water from farms.  That’s a new one for me, and I’m not sure it’s true.

We ALL have an investment in California growing food, it supplies all of America with a huge, surprising percentage of the total food we eat.   

Comments?
Z

 

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20 Responses to CALIFORNIA FARMING and WATER

  1. Mustang says:

    It is a complex issue, in my opinion. California’s natural environment has shifted quite a bit since the mid-1800s. Part of this has to do with massive increases in human population, human modification to the environment, and events beyond the control of Californians (Japan’s tsunami, for one) … but I think the major problem is California’s legislature.

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  2. I think “Chinatown” when I think of water and LA. 🙂
    But a leftist regime that equates Gaia, smelt and humans, that feels there is a malthusian threat, will not put people first.
    Your communist masters are starving the population like they did in Ukraine.

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  3. Linda Goossen says:

    I live in western KS, and we praise the Lord for every drop of water we get. We think CA has cut off its nose to spite their residents! Of course, the blame goes to the people who keep voting them in.The smelt doesn’t add anything. Is it even a fish that can be eaten? Do they eat it?

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  4. bocopro says:

    Spent a lotta time in California. Loved the SFran area back in the early 60s. Don’t even wanna go there for a visit these days.

    Lived in Long Beach (Navy Housing) for over 3 years, early 70s. Great life, kids growin up, dog in the back yard, plenty of sunshine and golf, calm Pacific waters for my light cruiser to steam around in . . . when we weren’t in the Gulf of Tonkin or the Sea of Japan.

    If you look at southern California, you’ll see a natural desert. Prob’ly designed by nature to support half a million people in terms of resources, especially water. Of course, then, 25 million morons decided it would be a perfect place to live.

    Unsustainable life style. Any major change in the Colorado and SoCal dries up like a gecko stuck between the storm-window panes. It’s feast or famine . . . either in a 5-year drought or a wash-everything-away flood. And when it DOES rain, the scrub growth explodes to create spectacular fires amongst the canyons where containing it is virtually impossible, especially when the Santa Ana winds roar into town.

    Calexit. Very likely the next brilliant mindstorm from the displaced Okies and fence-jumpers. Just wonder, tho, what the Pentagon’s reaction would be to having several of its largest military facilities now located in a foreign country.

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  5. Lana Hessenius says:

    I agree with Linda. I retired from Denver and moved to western KS. The fields are beautiful. I hope we don’t get any hail. CA has been ruined by their government.

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  6. geeez2014 says:

    It’s a fabulous state with wonderful people, gorgeous beaches, amazing mountains……you can snow ski and water ski within a few hours……
    And nearly every friend I have is a very strong conservative and we’ve elected fabulous conservatives like George Deukmejian and Pete Wilson and others….but Sacramento is very strong, and this governor is a NUT… I’d call him “the Angela Merkel of California”, actually, come to think of it.

    I wouldn’t live anywhere else……but we sure do have to fix that water problem in the Central Valley.

    Those fish are NOT food, they’re tiny little things which I’ve been told thrive elsewhere, so I say “send them there.”

    LINDA: YOUR COMMENT IS EXACTLY RIGHT..

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  7. We eat smelt in Michigan.
    People go smelting.
    Have ’em at fish fries.
    http://allrecipes.com/recipe/236481/fried-smelts/

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  8. Baysider says:

    That water problem led to 28% unemployment in the San Joaquin valley at one point. The smelt is just a stalking horse. The argument is that it dies in the dams’ water pumps. More careful research began to show a biological problem though years ago, which is probably why the numbers are down to 1.

    I’ve been out early doing qigong in my front yard before all the city noise starts up, appreciating the glorious aspects of so cal living – the dusty green of my apple tree, contrasted with the bright yellow green of the oranges tree, the jasmine, the heavenly scent of the ginger….. won’t think about what Sacramento has done to our paradise.

    Ed: Read Water to the Angels – I think that’s the title – the real story about bringing water to LA. It’s riveting! Even more so than Chinatown.

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  9. Bocopro, A friend of mine is putting together a mil-based Calexit anthology,

    His entry is here:
    https://oldnfo.org/2017/06/23/anybody-interested-short-novella/

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  10. Mal says:

    Z, fresh water IS important to Salmon because they spawn up stream in rivers. And yes, my home state of California where I spent the first 58 years of my life has been destroyed forever. I really miss the 40’s & 50’s in L.A. They were unmatchable.

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  11. Kid says:

    Smelt is not the issue. Leftards are the issue and when they want to work an agenda, they’ll find something to use. If not smelt, some cave spider.

    Anceint civilizations were better at managing water than California is. California gets a lot of water from the Colorado which is primarily fed by Lake Powell. I looked an was surprised to see the water level up from 2007. 3605 ft above sea level in 2007, 3700 ft today. 100 feet of water across a lake that big is a lot of water. Seems this could all be fixed pretty easily by California creating many more resovoirs and slowly filling them up with available water on the Colorado.

    Anyway, I read over the last couple days, some farmer was fined a million bucks by the EPA for plowing his fields without their blessing. What is the problem getting this stupid stuff rolled back?

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  12. Baysider says:

    The problem is bureaucrats who issue edicts without recourse – unless you have a million dollar lawyer donating his time (which is why we’re supporters of the Pacific Legal Foundation here).

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  13. John M. Berger says:

    @Lana Hessenius ,

    “CA has been ruined by their government”

    Yes and we (Colorado) are next! It’s been predicted for years. Western Kansas why not! It’s still a Conservative state and you won’t need to worry about over population.

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  14. geeez2014 says:

    Ed, so glad for your correction. I actually love small fried fish and while the smelt situation in California’s not about the food fish, it’s about extinction of something that thrives in many other places so it’s not about it being a food and that’s what I meant… I should have said it’s not about them being food/ I do love them in general.

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  15. The snelt are thrivibg here.
    I’ve got a comment in moderation I was hoping Bocopro would see.

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  16. Kid says:

    I read something decent where California would be sliced into 2 or 3 sections. Anyway, I don’t see anyway out of this than to split the country in two. The left seem to like the north. Give them as many Nothern states as they need and we Americans will inhabit the rest.

    Irreconcilible Differences.

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  17. Jersey Jack says:

    @bocopro..”a gecko stuck between the storm-window panes.”

    Man…where and how do you come up with this never ending trove of great anecdotes? Tell us the truth…are you a reincarnation of Will Rogers?

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  18. Bob says:

    I love almonds. I read somewhere the growing almonds uses more water then most crops. How about lettuce? Heck, the vegetable is mostly water. Oh, and those juicy grapes gotta use water. Put all this together with the fact that a good bit of California is a desert, including Los Angeles, and water has always been a problem. Water is a priority that California cannot mismanage any longer. Forget the Delta Smelt. Forget watering lawns. The liberals in California need an education in conserving natural resources, and losing a species now and then is not the worst thing that can happen.

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  19. Jersey Jack says:

    Bob…it’s said we lose a species a day whether we know it or not…and it’s been this way for millions of years. Nature is the better steward for defining what species should thrive or die out and other species thrive off those who demise is generally unnoticed, like this smelt or a sand flea or in Texas a lizard preventing drilling…. their disappearance might be preordained anyway. We go too far ( Government pukes like the EPA ) and achieve very little for those efforts that in the end just hurt mankind.

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